Letter to MEPS on Copyright Reform en

By mbb on Monday 24 September 2018 01:49 - Comments (3)
Categories: Copyright, Politics, Views: 1.014

Needing to write a lettter for the https://saveyourinternet.eu/ anyway, I'm trowing it up on my blog. I doubt it will change their minds, but perhaps ideas of it can be of use to someone some day.

-----

While I agree that journalists provide a useful service, and can concede that they may need some protection, I do not agree that it entitles them to a share of advertisement or tech sector revenue.
Above all, newspapers make money because they were an effective medium to distribute news memes to a wide audience. The public does not exist so publishers can make money.

The problem seems to have arisen from two useful features of the internet; easy worldwide access that exposes them to international competition of larger, cheaper or more expert publishers.
And the ability of everyone to cheaply start broadcasting worldwide, creating competition by local free bloggers and meta-journalists that derive their income through other venues. Or are simply happy to be able to add their opinion to the public discussion and willing to invest their own time to do so. But breaking the internet for all should not be the solution to the problems of publishers.

As far as the publishers negotiation position to advertisement companies, perhaps there is a problem there. But then the action should be taken there, as it would benefit a lot more parties depending on advertisement revenue. Not just protecting large publishers. The EU has already tried to take action there against Google, and its GDPR could help too. But perhaps rather then taking post-fact action against one corporation, it should have created preventive explicit laws against all actions, weather by large or small advertisement companies, to create a more level playing field.

I do understand that because of pressure from industry activists, you do not have the political climate to follow electorate desires or follow societies trend towards a shorter and more flexible copyright protection.

However, I would request that during the upcoming discussions you keep the intention of copyright law in mind; to encourage the creation of new works that eventually will enter the public domain to the benefit of us all.
Republishing is the basis of European civilization; from the translating of ancient works during the renaissance, the distributing of forbidden works during the enlightenment, and the secret publishing of papers during the Second World War. (To which a lot of newspaper publishers of today can be traced back to.)

So I would ask that the EU at least puts in some incentives to have our culture become easier available to the public while it still has value. So we will be free to archive, use and remix, rather then only passively consume.


1) Create incentives in time;

Far stronger then general culture, news memes are of most value when it is fresh, and looses value over time. (In the case of stock news literally; before it is public you can make millions, after a trading stops it becomes worthless. ) While it is understandable that a paper wants to hold an article exclusive the first hours or day(s) of publication, it looses such urgency later. Having the ability to summarize, quote, comment, share, compare and review the article article (in parts or whole) should be possible while the article still has value to society, Not 70 years after death of the author.
Especially in the time of ‘fake news’ and forged science studies, free peer review should be possible without risk of the author suing for copyright.
A good example is Mr Verhofstadt’s open letter on CNN. Under the new law, while any EU citizen may want to cite parts or whole of it when commenting on it on their blogs, both publisher and author would need to be asked permission and paid royalties before allowing such public debate. And even in the rare case where such license would be given or waived, convincing the hosting party (usually a large tech site) of bypassing the upload filter, and having the original derivative content be used for filtering would be troublesome at best.

In the far past, work needed to be re-registered for copyrighted every few decades. While such a system would be problematic with today's volume of culture, it did help to track down the rights owner when wanting to re-publish.
But more importantly, it provided an incentive for the author to not renew copyright, when it was old enough that the expectation of return became too low. Today, not only is the incentive to abandon copyright no longer there, but there is not even a possibility to do so under current law.
Perhaps such an incentive can be re-introduced by exponentially increasing the taxation on royalties depending on the age of the work?


2) Prevent double legal protection.
Rather then adding more laws to restrict the distribution of culture and news among it’s citizens, the EU should be simplifying the law so only one applies at the same time.
On top of the automatic copyright protection, a lot of distributes use additional Digital Restriction Management (DRM) to limit users rights in what they deem appropriate. Unfortunately, this DRM software rarely adheres to user rights as laid out under copyright law. Thereby creating user problems from simple citation up to blocking the blind from using their translation software from accessing our culture.
To add a third barrier, breaking this DRM is itself forbidden by another law, making EU citizens unable to exercise our rights under copyright law.
Therefor it would urge you to put a restriction in copyright law that it only applies to such works where user rights are respected. Thereby still allowing publishers the choice if they want copyright law or DRM protection, but no longer both. Different publishers may even choose to publish the same work under the different laws, allowing even users the choice if they accept copyright or DRM restrictions.

3) Punishment for over-blocking.
To prevent excessive over-blocking in the filters, the punishment for falsely requesting take-downs should at least be equal to the uploading of in frighting content, including legal and administrative fees. Following the publishers logic; even if culture is shared for free, it does not mean it is without value. Providing this link may also encourage them to occasional keep in frighting fees down.
Perhaps wrongful infringement allegations should be punished even more, as the producers of works have created far less themselves that then were created by others. And there are far fewer exceptions for claiming take-down of content that is not yours, then there are exceptions for posting such works. Not to mention that unlike the sharing, it is often done by experts in their field.

Volgende: Response to Guy Verhofstadt on Europe 12-09 Response to Guy Verhofstadt on Europe

Comments


By Tweakers user Blokker_1999, Monday 24 September 2018 14:53

Enkele pijnpunten die je blijkbaar mist:

Is het normaal dat Google enkele seconden na publicatie een artikel kan indexeren en opnieuw kan tonen aan de gebruikers van zijn website waarbij Google advertentieinkomsten krijgt en de originele schrijver geen cent ziet? Het probleem is niet zozeer de concurentie die beter werk brengt maar dat anderen met de inkomsten gaan lopen terwijl jij je tijd investeerd in het onderzoek.

Je schrijft ook dat gebruikersrechten boven het auteursrecht moeten gaan. Maar beide zijn rechten. Zomaar stellen dat het recht dat jouw aanbelangt belangrijker is dan het recht dat een ander moet beschermen is dan ook een zeer eenvoudige stelling. Ik snap ook niet waarom er een keuze zou moeten zijn tussen DRM of copyright. Die twee dingen zijn namelijk onlosmakelijk met elkaar verbonden. Heb je geen copyright, dan is je DRM ook waardeloos want dan heb je geen rechten om ermee te beschermen.

En in je derde punt moet je denk ik je zinsopbouw eens zeer goed nalezen. Ik zou er ook wat commentaar op willen geven maar heb op dit moment moeite om te verstaan wat je geschreven hebt en daarom ben ik onzeker of mijn commentaar terecht zou zijn.

By Tweakers user we_are_borg, Tuesday 25 September 2018 09:09

Is het normaal dat Google enkele seconden na publicatie een artikel kan indexeren en opnieuw kan tonen aan de gebruikers van zijn website waarbij Google advertentieinkomsten krijgt en de originele schrijver geen cent ziet? Het probleem is niet zozeer de concurentie die beter werk brengt maar dat anderen met de inkomsten gaan lopen terwijl jij je tijd investeerd in het onderzoek.
Google laat op zijn eigen website een paar regels zien maximaal 2 a 3. Op die pagina waar het staat zijn ook geen advertenties te zien Google krijgt geen cent aangezien er niets staat. De pagina waarnaar toe gelinkt wordt als die Google Ads heeft dan deelt Google wel mee wil je dit niet dan maak je geen gebruik van Google Ads op je pagina.Wil je niet opgenomen worden in Google News maak dan even een bestand aan dan indexeer Google je nieuws niet meer.

By Tweakers user i-chat, Thursday 27 September 2018 17:46

Blokker_1999 wrote on Monday 24 September 2018 @ 14:53:
Enkele pijnpunten die je blijkbaar mist:

Je schrijft ook dat gebruikersrechten boven het auteursrecht moeten gaan. Maar beide zijn rechten. Zomaar stellen dat het recht dat jouw aanbelangt belangrijker is dan het recht dat een ander moet beschermen is dan ook een zeer eenvoudige stelling. Ik snap ook niet waarom er een keuze zou moeten zijn tussen DRM of copyright. Die twee dingen zijn namelijk onlosmakelijk met elkaar verbonden. Heb je geen copyright, dan is je DRM ook waardeloos want dan heb je geen rechten om ermee te beschermen.
Beste Blokker, Ik begrijp dat Nederlands recht nogal lastig in elkaar zit maar het wordt er echt niet beter op als je mis-informatie de wereld in stuurt. Zowel je technische als je juridische onderbouwingen kloppen doorgaans niet heel erg.

Voor de mensen die het tot nog toe hebben gemist zal ik het nogmaals uitleggen.

Copyrights volgens Nederlands model staan verankerd in onze wet sinds +/-1800 maar zelfs daarvoor (en zelfs voor de Franse tijd (dus de vroege middeleeuwen), was er al sprake van eigendomsrecht op geschreven werken. Deze eigendomsrechten hebben altijd op gespannen voet gestaan met onder andere de wetenschap.

in de moderne auteurswet (1912) zoals we die nu kennen staan 2 fundamenten centraal.

1: het recht van de auteur om te doen en te laten met zijn werk wat hij wil.
2: het recht van anderen om binnen vastgestelde grenzen andermans werk te gebruiken of hij dit nu wil of niet.
- redenen hiervoor zijn oa:
* voor onderwijs,
* voor aanpassingen ten behoeve van gehandicapten.
* en beperkt; voor eigen (niet commercieel) gebruik.

Het volgende is er nu aan de hand, in zijn blog schrijft hij dat DRM-software deze 2e categorie aan rechten belemmerd en dat dit in beginsel onwettig, of in ieder geval onrechtmatig is. Daar heeft hij gelijk in.

Jij stelt vervolgens dat hij een van beide pilaren belangrijker vindt, en dat je de 2 niet tegen elkaar mag afwegen ten nadele van de auteur.
En juist hier ga je de mist in, dat is namelijk precies waarom de wetgever die 2 pilaren heeft gebouwd als bescherming tegen al te bezitterige content-eigenaren en daarmee oneigenlijk gebruik van de auteurswet.

Feit is uiteindelijk dat beide delen even belangrijk zijn en gehoorzaamd dienen te worden, blogger stelt dan vervolgens een oplossing voor namelijk dat het auteurs vrij moet zijn van de auteurswet af te wijken door DRM, maar dat krakers en downloaders dan vrij-uit gaan als het ze toch lukt. dat is in principe natuurlijke fair-game. want waarom moet de een zich wel aan de wet houden wanneer de ander dat ook niet doet?

edit:
leesbaarheid

[Comment edited on Thursday 27 September 2018 17:51]


In order to comment on this post you need to be logged in. Use this link to log in when you are already a registered user. If you don't have an account you can create one here.